Gender

Our staff have extensive experience of working on gender-related projects in the UK and overseas, both for evaluation and policy purposes. This work has included a review of the use of value for money methodologies in projects relating to women and girls in developing countries. We are currently working on a 3-year project with women’s groups in Coventry that sets outs to examine the value of ‘joined up’ services for vulnerable women in the community. 

Gender, International development and finance
Mark Kucharski 630844 Unsplash
Gender & Adolescence: Global Evidence (GAGE) VfM Review

As part of the DfID-funded Gender & Adolescence: Global Evidence (GAGE) project, Just Economics was commissioned to review the use of value for money (VfM) analyses in projects aimed at adolescent girls in developing countries. This included a review of relevant literatures and theoretical approaches and a series of principles for carrying out such analyses in the future.

Who we work with

Client Logo The Scottish Government
Client Logo Itad
Client Logo British Telecoms
Client Logo Ucd
Client Logo Microsoft
Client Logo Cabinet Office
Client Logo Living Streets
Client Logo Amnestry International
Client Logo University Of Maynooth
Client Logo Focus Ireland
Client Logo Womens Budget Group
Client Jamie Oliver Foundation
Client Logo Bookstart
Client Logo Football Foundation
Client Logo Cafod
Client Logo Iied
Lra Logo Ni
Just Economics Wbg Report Image
The value of integrated working

There is an established need for women-oriented services, particularly in relation to violence, abuse and mental health, and an emerging evidence base on the benefits that gender-sensitive services can bring. The  aim of the Coventry women's partnership is to to improve outcomes for vulnerable women locally by providing a more joined-up, needs-led service across five women's organisations. The project was a three-year pilot funded by the Smallwood Trust and coordinated by the Women's Budget Group. Women reported substantial – and statistically significant – improvements in their mental health, physical health, relationships, finances, debt, legal status and housing. Service staff also reported that increased collaboration, more effective referrals and greater knowledge of partner services had improved the quality of services and, as a result, also outcomes for women.